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How you can use the RetailTech Model

The first stage is Research & Development, when an innovation is not fully-fledged and has not yet been adopted beyond prototypes, trials or POCs.

New technologies typically go through 5+ years of R&D, though the timeframe will vary substantially depending on the degree of innovation entailed.

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Model Stages

The Leading Edge stage indicates when an innovation has moved out of R&D and into operation. Approximately 5% of the market adopts the innovation at this stage, usually start-ups and a few industry players known for being forward-looking.

Sometimes, an innovation is picked up from another sector. As indicated in the timeline below, it typically takes 1 to 3 years to move from the Leading Edge to Early Adopters stage.

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Model Timeline

At this stage organisations are more risk averse than those at the Leading Edge, but are still keen to be in the industry’s upper quartile and adopt a new technology.

The broad timeline for technologies to remain at this stage is 2 to 5 years at which point they will have reached around 25% market adoption.

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Model Origins

By this point a technology or business innovation can be considered as Mainstream since it will have been implemented by around 50% of the market.

2-5 years is the typical timeframe for this stage.

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Model Lenses

Technologies in the Late Adopters stage have been widely adopted across the industry with 80% - 100% of the market using them after a further 5+ years.

Not all technologies end up being adopted by everyone, with some 20% of technologies never reaching full adoption.

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R&D

The first stage is Research & Development, when an innovation is not fully-fledged and has not yet been adopted beyond prototypes, trials or POCs.

New technologies typically go through 5+ years of R&D, though the timeframe will vary substantially depending on the degree of innovation entailed.

. .
5+
Leading Edge

The Leading Edge stage indicates when an innovation has moved out of R&D and into operation. Approximately 5% of the market adopts the innovation at this stage, usually start-ups and a few industry players known for being forward-looking.

Sometimes, an innovation is picked up from another sector. As indicated in the timeline below, it typically takes 1 to 3 years to move from the Leading Edge to Early Adopters stage.

. .
5%
1-3
Early Adopters

At this stage organisations are more risk averse than those at the Leading Edge, but are still keen to be in the industry’s upper quartile and adopt a new technology.

The broad timeline for technologies to remain at this stage is 2 to 5 years at which point they will have reached around 25% market adoption.

. .
25%
2-5
Mainstream

By this point a technology or business innovation can be considered as Mainstream since it will have been implemented by around 50% of the market.

2-5 years is the typical timeframe for this stage.

. .
50%
2-5
Late Adopters

Technologies in the Late Adopters stage have been widely adopted across the industry with 80% - 100% of the market using them after a further 5+ years.

Not all technologies end up being adopted by everyone, with some 20% of technologies never reaching full adoption.

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80%-100%
5+

The first stage is Research & Development, when an innovation is not fully-fledged and has not yet been adopted beyond prototypes, trials or POCs.

New technologies typically go through 5+ years of R&D, though the timeframe will vary substantially depending on the degree of innovation entailed.

The Leading Edge stage indicates when an innovation has moved out of R&D and into operation. Approximately 5% of the market adopts the innovation at this stage, usually start-ups and a few industry players known for being forward-looking.

Sometimes, an innovation is picked up from another sector. As indicated in the timeline below, it typically takes 1 to 3 years to move from the Leading Edge to Early Adopters stage.

At this stage organisations are more risk averse than those at the Leading Edge, but are still keen to be in the industry’s upper quartile and adopt a new technology.

The broad timeline for technologies to remain at this stage is 2 to 5 years at which point they will have reached around 25% market adoption.

By this point a technology or business innovation can be considered as Mainstream since it will have been implemented by around 50% of the market.

2-5 years is the typical timeframe for this stage.

Technologies in the Late Adopters stage have been widely adopted across the industry with 80% - 100% of the market using them after a further 5+ years.

Not all technologies end up being adopted by everyone, with some 20% of technologies never reaching full adoption.

Old Problems, Brand New Solutions

Dynamic sourcing (“Uber for people”) will be picked up across all sectors, but perhaps most of all in retail. This is because retail experiences seasonal peaks, and so many aspects of the business still require low-skilled workers, whether on the shop floor, in the warehouse or in delivery. The on-demand model is being applied to shopping, too, with InstaCart and other grocery delivery services becoming common.

Advanced workforce analytics will inform these new resourcing models – each with their pluses and minuses in terms of cost and quality – as well as issues of productivity, payroll costs, rotation and labor forecasting. Analytics will be supported by real-time store monitoring that aggregates data from people counters, Wi-Fi, sensors, POS and RFID to provide a comprehensive view of store activity.

This insight will help experienced store managers gain true command of their teams. They will be able to use mobile initiatives, enabled by employee app stores, to boost internal communications and processes. For example, apps will allow staff to view KPIs, receive alerts of upcoming tasks or notices of waiting customers and perform actions such as requesting holiday time, registering sickness and receiving training.

In the back office, productivity will increase through Robotic Process Automation (RPA). RPA software will take over tasks such as re-entering data, freeing up human workers. The next stage in automation is already in R&D. Human-computer interfaces and cognitive assistants will soon be able to support routine tasks and decision making.

Augmented reality will add further support for managerial tasks. For instance, by presenting multiple data views simultaneously, employees can make better decisions regarding, say, supply chain or finance. 3D imaging and virtual reality will further transform store design, augmented with real-time data input from sensors and traffic monitoring systems.

Explore the RetailTech Model for People & Assets to understand these and other technology innovations changing the employee experience.

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People & Assets Expert

Neale Almond
DXC Retail Practice

Arrange a meeting with Neale Almond

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