Mobile & Workplace

Just as mobility is transforming the customer experience, new technology is creating an informed retail workplace, with associates empowered to maximize every customer interaction. Equipped with modern technology, store associates rise to the occasion. Meet a truly agile retail workforce.

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How you can use the RetailTech Model

The first stage is Research & Development, when an innovation is not fully-fledged and has not yet been adopted beyond prototypes, trials or POCs.

New technologies typically go through 5+ years of R&D, though the timeframe will vary substantially depending on the degree of innovation entailed.

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Model Stages

The Leading Edge stage indicates when an innovation has moved out of R&D and into operation. Approximately 5% of the market adopts the innovation at this stage, usually start-ups and a few industry players known for being forward-looking.

Sometimes, an innovation is picked up from another sector. As indicated in the timeline below, it typically takes 1 to 3 years to move from the Leading Edge to Early Adopters stage.

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Model Timeline

At this stage organisations are more risk averse than those at the Leading Edge, but are still keen to be in the industry’s upper quartile and adopt a new technology.

The broad timeline for technologies to remain at this stage is 2 to 5 years at which point they will have reached around 25% market adoption.

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Model Origins

By this point a technology or business innovation can be considered as Mainstream since it will have been implemented by around 50% of the market.

2-5 years is the typical timeframe for this stage.

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Model Lenses

Technologies in the Late Adopters stage have been widely adopted across the industry with 80% - 100% of the market using them after a further 5+ years.

Not all technologies end up being adopted by everyone, with some 20% of technologies never reaching full adoption.

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R&D

The first stage is Research & Development, when an innovation is not fully-fledged and has not yet been adopted beyond prototypes, trials or POCs.

New technologies typically go through 5+ years of R&D, though the timeframe will vary substantially depending on the degree of innovation entailed.

. .
5+
Leading Edge

The Leading Edge stage indicates when an innovation has moved out of R&D and into operation. Approximately 5% of the market adopts the innovation at this stage, usually start-ups and a few industry players known for being forward-looking.

Sometimes, an innovation is picked up from another sector. As indicated in the timeline below, it typically takes 1 to 3 years to move from the Leading Edge to Early Adopters stage.

. .
5%
1-3
Early Adopters

At this stage organisations are more risk averse than those at the Leading Edge, but are still keen to be in the industry’s upper quartile and adopt a new technology.

The broad timeline for technologies to remain at this stage is 2 to 5 years at which point they will have reached around 25% market adoption.

. .
25%
2-5
Mainstream

By this point a technology or business innovation can be considered as Mainstream since it will have been implemented by around 50% of the market.

2-5 years is the typical timeframe for this stage.

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50%
2-5
Late Adopters

Technologies in the Late Adopters stage have been widely adopted across the industry with 80% - 100% of the market using them after a further 5+ years.

Not all technologies end up being adopted by everyone, with some 20% of technologies never reaching full adoption.

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80%-100%
5+

The first stage is Research & Development, when an innovation is not fully-fledged and has not yet been adopted beyond prototypes, trials or POCs.

New technologies typically go through 5+ years of R&D, though the timeframe will vary substantially depending on the degree of innovation entailed.

The Leading Edge stage indicates when an innovation has moved out of R&D and into operation. Approximately 5% of the market adopts the innovation at this stage, usually start-ups and a few industry players known for being forward-looking.

Sometimes, an innovation is picked up from another sector. As indicated in the timeline below, it typically takes 1 to 3 years to move from the Leading Edge to Early Adopters stage.

At this stage organisations are more risk averse than those at the Leading Edge, but are still keen to be in the industry’s upper quartile and adopt a new technology.

The broad timeline for technologies to remain at this stage is 2 to 5 years at which point they will have reached around 25% market adoption.

By this point a technology or business innovation can be considered as Mainstream since it will have been implemented by around 50% of the market.

2-5 years is the typical timeframe for this stage.

Technologies in the Late Adopters stage have been widely adopted across the industry with 80% - 100% of the market using them after a further 5+ years.

Not all technologies end up being adopted by everyone, with some 20% of technologies never reaching full adoption.

Using Mobility to Rethink the Store Experience

The mobile-enabled employee, supported by mobile ERP, is ready and able to meet customer needs. Using tablets, associates can help reduce wait times at the checkout counter. They can offer customers the opportunity to use loyalty points, access special offers or browse websites together to explore purchase options. All of these acts build trust and customer loyalty.

Customer service can be further enhanced through guided selling apps that show the store associate how to handle the customer journey or prompt “next- best” offers. Moreover, retailers are exploring how to make store associates smarter than their customers. When customers use price comparison apps for example, the store associate should already be advised, via his or her tablet, how to address the issue. Perhaps the app links to a central system that permits a discretionary combined purchase deal to negate price disadvantage.

In the near future, a combination of mobile and beacon technology will offer associates information about where customers are in the store, and what they’re doing. Workers will be instantly informed about customer’s browsing habits and be able to make timely interjections, supported by promotions sent to the customer’s smartphone. Still in the R&D stage, cognitive computing will shift the role of in-store IT from automation to advice, with customer suggestions being continually enhanced through machine learning.

While apps improve the customer experience, they will also streamline back-office and HR tasks. Training applications, staff scheduling, requests for vacation leave or sick days can be done by apps. Associates that engage with customers and their workplace in these enhanced ways – and via the same technology they use in their personal lives – will have higher levels of job satisfaction.

The Mobile & Workplace lens allows you to see the full range of technologies that can be applied to increase employee productivity and customer satisfaction.

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Mobile & Workplace Expert

Henk Hoevelaken
DXC Mobility & Workplace Practice

Arrange a meeting with Henk Hoevelaken

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