Customer Experience

The nearly universal adoption of smartphones by today’s consumers puts mobile initiatives at the top of the agenda for retailers, with real-time analytics being a close second. Of course, success comes from bringing them both together.

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How you can use the RetailTech Model

The first stage is Research & Development, when an innovation is not fully-fledged and has not yet been adopted beyond prototypes, trials or POCs.

New technologies typically go through 5+ years of R&D, though the timeframe will vary substantially depending on the degree of innovation entailed.

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Model Stages

The Leading Edge stage indicates when an innovation has moved out of R&D and into operation. Approximately 5% of the market adopts the innovation at this stage, usually start-ups and a few industry players known for being forward-looking.

Sometimes, an innovation is picked up from another sector. As indicated in the timeline below, it typically takes 1 to 3 years to move from the Leading Edge to Early Adopters stage.

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Model Timeline

At this stage organisations are more risk averse than those at the Leading Edge, but are still keen to be in the industry’s upper quartile and adopt a new technology.

The broad timeline for technologies to remain at this stage is 2 to 5 years at which point they will have reached around 25% market adoption.

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Model Origins

By this point a technology or business innovation can be considered as Mainstream since it will have been implemented by around 50% of the market.

2-5 years is the typical timeframe for this stage.

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Model Lenses

Technologies in the Late Adopters stage have been widely adopted across the industry with 80% - 100% of the market using them after a further 5+ years.

Not all technologies end up being adopted by everyone, with some 20% of technologies never reaching full adoption.

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R&D

The first stage is Research & Development, when an innovation is not fully-fledged and has not yet been adopted beyond prototypes, trials or POCs.

New technologies typically go through 5+ years of R&D, though the timeframe will vary substantially depending on the degree of innovation entailed.

. .
5+
Leading Edge

The Leading Edge stage indicates when an innovation has moved out of R&D and into operation. Approximately 5% of the market adopts the innovation at this stage, usually start-ups and a few industry players known for being forward-looking.

Sometimes, an innovation is picked up from another sector. As indicated in the timeline below, it typically takes 1 to 3 years to move from the Leading Edge to Early Adopters stage.

. .
5%
1-3
Early Adopters

At this stage organisations are more risk averse than those at the Leading Edge, but are still keen to be in the industry’s upper quartile and adopt a new technology.

The broad timeline for technologies to remain at this stage is 2 to 5 years at which point they will have reached around 25% market adoption.

. .
25%
2-5
Mainstream

By this point a technology or business innovation can be considered as Mainstream since it will have been implemented by around 50% of the market.

2-5 years is the typical timeframe for this stage.

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50%
2-5
Late Adopters

Technologies in the Late Adopters stage have been widely adopted across the industry with 80% - 100% of the market using them after a further 5+ years.

Not all technologies end up being adopted by everyone, with some 20% of technologies never reaching full adoption.

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80%-100%
5+

The first stage is Research & Development, when an innovation is not fully-fledged and has not yet been adopted beyond prototypes, trials or POCs.

New technologies typically go through 5+ years of R&D, though the timeframe will vary substantially depending on the degree of innovation entailed.

The Leading Edge stage indicates when an innovation has moved out of R&D and into operation. Approximately 5% of the market adopts the innovation at this stage, usually start-ups and a few industry players known for being forward-looking.

Sometimes, an innovation is picked up from another sector. As indicated in the timeline below, it typically takes 1 to 3 years to move from the Leading Edge to Early Adopters stage.

At this stage organisations are more risk averse than those at the Leading Edge, but are still keen to be in the industry’s upper quartile and adopt a new technology.

The broad timeline for technologies to remain at this stage is 2 to 5 years at which point they will have reached around 25% market adoption.

By this point a technology or business innovation can be considered as Mainstream since it will have been implemented by around 50% of the market.

2-5 years is the typical timeframe for this stage.

Technologies in the Late Adopters stage have been widely adopted across the industry with 80% - 100% of the market using them after a further 5+ years.

Not all technologies end up being adopted by everyone, with some 20% of technologies never reaching full adoption.

Brand Experience: The New Currency of Retail

The ability to personalize customer interactions has changed the retail game, and perhaps the clearest sign of this is the in-store beacon.

In China in 2015, the jewelry retailer Chow Tai Fook started using beacons to offer deals in store. The company found that 60% of coupons were redeemed when the offer reached customers at the right time and place; the sales uplift was around $16 million across 200 stores.

Though largely in the R&D stage, “contextual shopping” or “physicalization” builds on the success of mobile couponing to create real engagement. With this approach, knowledge about the customer is combined with context derived from GPS, Wi-Fi, beacons, sensors or even the environment, e.g., the time of day or weather. In the future, cognitive computing will be used to better understand customer behavior and preferences, adapting and learning through every interaction with individual customers.

Customers, especially today’s “screenagers,” are widening their search for “cool” stores where smartphones come to life and heighten the interaction. They enjoy finding what they’re looking for faster, being recognized, greeted and acknowledged by staff. They enjoy the fully immersive experience. And some stores are enhancing that with gamification principles that bring virtual and augmented reality into the marketing mix. Entire environments can now be created in VR. Proponents are already speaking of a store without shelves, one of just endless experiences.

Explore the RetailTech Model for Customer Engagement to understand these and other technology innovations changing the shopping experience.

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Customer Experience Expert

Cyril Coste
DXC Digital Practice

Arrange a meeting with Cyril Coste

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