DXC Innovation Model

Get to know the business and technology trends disrupting your industry

How does the innovation model work?

The DXC Innovation Model maps technology-driven innovation across five stages of market adoption, beginning with research and development (R&D) and continuing through late adoption. The model shows the degree to which a technology has been adopted in the industry. A timeline tracks how long it typically takes an innovation to move from one stage to the next. Click on each stage to learn more.

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How you can use the RetailTech Model

The first stage is Research & Development, when an innovation is not fully-fledged and has not yet been adopted beyond prototypes, trials or POCs.

New technologies typically go through 5+ years of R&D, though the timeframe will vary substantially depending on the degree of innovation entailed.

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Model Stages

The Leading Edge stage indicates when an innovation has moved out of R&D and into operation. Approximately 5% of the market adopts the innovation at this stage, usually start-ups and a few industry players known for being forward-looking.

Sometimes, an innovation is picked up from another sector. As indicated in the timeline below, it typically takes 1 to 3 years to move from the Leading Edge to Early Adopters stage.

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Model Timeline

At this stage organisations are more risk averse than those at the Leading Edge, but are still keen to be in the industry’s upper quartile and adopt a new technology.

The broad timeline for technologies to remain at this stage is 2 to 5 years at which point they will have reached around 25% market adoption.

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Model Origins

By this point a technology or business innovation can be considered as Mainstream since it will have been implemented by around 50% of the market.

2-5 years is the typical timeframe for this stage.

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Model Lenses

Technologies in the Late Adopters stage have been widely adopted across the industry with 80% - 100% of the market using them after a further 5+ years.

Not all technologies end up being adopted by everyone, with some 20% of technologies never reaching full adoption.

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R&D

The first stage is Research & Development, when an innovation is not fully-fledged and has not yet been adopted beyond prototypes, trials or POCs.

New technologies typically go through 5+ years of R&D, though the timeframe will vary substantially depending on the degree of innovation entailed.

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5+
Leading Edge

The Leading Edge stage indicates when an innovation has moved out of R&D and into operation. Approximately 5% of the market adopts the innovation at this stage, usually start-ups and a few industry players known for being forward-looking.

Sometimes, an innovation is picked up from another sector. As indicated in the timeline below, it typically takes 1 to 3 years to move from the Leading Edge to Early Adopters stage.

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5%
1-3
Early Adopters

At this stage organisations are more risk averse than those at the Leading Edge, but are still keen to be in the industry’s upper quartile and adopt a new technology.

The broad timeline for technologies to remain at this stage is 2 to 5 years at which point they will have reached around 25% market adoption.

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25%
2-5
Mainstream

By this point a technology or business innovation can be considered as Mainstream since it will have been implemented by around 50% of the market.

2-5 years is the typical timeframe for this stage.

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50%
2-5
Late Adopters

Technologies in the Late Adopters stage have been widely adopted across the industry with 80% - 100% of the market using them after a further 5+ years.

Not all technologies end up being adopted by everyone, with some 20% of technologies never reaching full adoption.

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80%-100%
5+

The first stage is Research & Development, when an innovation is not fully-fledged and has not yet been adopted beyond prototypes, trials or POCs.

New technologies typically go through 5+ years of R&D, though the timeframe will vary substantially depending on the degree of innovation entailed.

The Leading Edge stage indicates when an innovation has moved out of R&D and into operation. Approximately 5% of the market adopts the innovation at this stage, usually start-ups and a few industry players known for being forward-looking.

Sometimes, an innovation is picked up from another sector. As indicated in the timeline below, it typically takes 1 to 3 years to move from the Leading Edge to Early Adopters stage.

At this stage organisations are more risk averse than those at the Leading Edge, but are still keen to be in the industry’s upper quartile and adopt a new technology.

The broad timeline for technologies to remain at this stage is 2 to 5 years at which point they will have reached around 25% market adoption.

By this point a technology or business innovation can be considered as Mainstream since it will have been implemented by around 50% of the market.

2-5 years is the typical timeframe for this stage.

Technologies in the Late Adopters stage have been widely adopted across the industry with 80% - 100% of the market using them after a further 5+ years.

Not all technologies end up being adopted by everyone, with some 20% of technologies never reaching full adoption.

Who can use the model?

Both business and IT leaders in Banking & Capital Markets and Retail can benefit. We’ve created separate versions of the model for FinTech and RetailTech. Click on the model that’s right for your industry, and explore how you can harness the global megatrends of Analytics & Data, Cloud, Mobile & Workplace and Security.

Why use the innovation models?

In today’s technology-driven world, it is vital for businesses to shape strategy with technical investments – but deciding when and how to invest can be a daunting task. If you adopt a new technology too early, you risk being on the “bleeding edge”; embrace it too late and you risk losing competitive advantage.

DXC has created the Innovation Model to help address this challenge. Behind our approach is the thinking of Everett Rogers, who pioneered the analysis of how, why and at what rate new ideas and technology spread. Using this concept, DXC experts calibrated the Innovation Model with input from our own research and development, our experience with customers and discussions with start-ups, partners and industry SMEs.

The result is a way to benchmark your current capabilities and see where you stand when compared to your competitors. In addition, you gain insight into the opportunities and threats that lie ahead and make sure you are the disrupter – not the disrupted.

Now is the time to understand and embrace the opportunities presented by new technologies. Get to know your level of innovation today.

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David Rimmer
Business Innovation Lead
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Andrew Dare
Technology Innovation Lead

Arrange a meeting with Andrew Dare